Attentiveness and the Fruit of the Spirit

What a Justin Bieber Music Video Taught Me About Paying Attention

I cried over a Justin Bieber music video. 2020 really is wild.

Watch to the end, when the distraught couple are invited in the “direction of a warm meal.”

Hopefully you made it to the end! It might be understandable if you didn’t…human attention span is decreasing. It doesn’t take a study to recognize our modern dilemma of constant bombardment of information, technology, social media, etc.

The illustration of attentiveness in this video struck me as a beautiful antidote to the noise. I was caught up in the plight of the young couple – burdened by job loss and family abandonment – when a kind soul, who surely is juggling his own trials, notices the homeless pair and invites them to his home. The kind, selfless, non-judgmental hospitality portrayed is beautiful!

I was touched and challenged by this song and video – if I slow down, and pay attention, what might I notice around me?

Every human has a story, with unique wounds and wisdom. If we listen, we can both love and learn.

Every human needs love. We were created by love and for love-in relationship and community.

Every human has a story, with unique wounds and wisdom. If we listen, we can both love and learn.

Ultimately, attentiveness displays kindness, goodness, gentleness…does this ring a bell?

“But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law.” (Galatians 5:22, ESV)

These characteristics exude Christ and attract the human heart, opening the door to God’s love – the love we all most desperately need. If there is anything we need next month, I’d say it’s definitely attentiveness with the fruit of the Spirit!

As we continue through a very hard year, and a divisive season as we head into October, I want to challenge myself to pay attention – to notice the humans around me (including when it’s me!) who are hurting and in need of love. Will you join me?

Here are a few specific ideas for practicing and forming a spirit of attentiveness:

  1. Text a friend going through a trial to check-in, and let them know you’ll follow up next week (or invite them to coffee!).
  2. Go for a walk around your neighborhood and leave the phone at home.
  3. Try the 5-4-3-2-1 method to reduce anxiety. It will keep you grounded and cultivate your ability to notice your surroundings.
  4. Meditate on the fruit of the spirit (or another meaningful Scripture passage).
  5. Spend some time in nature and notice the little things to practice attentiveness.

Blessings on October. I’d love to know your thoughts on the video, or other practices for paying attention in the comments!


Change in the Air

Pulled on my fall flannel, for the first time this year;

And jeans, snug and comforting.

After a quick drive, and a few steps, I’ve been transported.

Sounds of a chorus of buzzing bugs set my pace.

Deep breaths of fresh air filled my lungs, providing a new rhythm;

Calming my anxious mind and relaxing my body.

Soft and slow ripples in the water flowed towards me, a welcome to rest.

The lushness of summer’s greens has been infiltrated with reds and yellows.

Signals that time is moving to a new season.

Like the foliage before me, life finds a way of providing signs.

Am I walking slowly enough to pay attention?

To hear what’s in the whisper of the wind?

Am I seeking intimacy with my Creator to notice his nudgings?

With the aroma of change in the air,

The sun sets on another day.

A chance to reflect. To confess, to worship, to pray.

To welcome a posture of openness to God’s direction.

To be led by Him, looking for his signals; be they red, green, or yellow.

Every hard lesson after hard lesson, I find;

His way, especially in the waiting, is best.

Psalm 73

23 Nevertheless, I am continually with you;
    you hold my right hand.
24 You guide me with your counsel,
    and afterward you will receive me to glory.
25 Whom have I in heaven but you?
    And there is nothing on earth that I desire besides you.
26 My flesh and my heart may fail,
    but God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.


In Death Valley, You Are Never Alone

Three Things to Remember in Hard Times

“Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I will fear no evil;
For You are with me;
Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me.”
Psalm 23: 4, NKJV

Death Valley, CA, August 2019

Last year for Labor Day, I headed west. It felt good to take a few days off work, pack up my hiking gear, and hop on a plane (that world seems so different and long ago!).

One of the national parks I visited was Death Valley. I was interested in visiting it for a number of reasons, including my hope of experiencing it as a spiritual pilgrimage.

Being that it was the end of August, and pushing 115 degrees, it wasn’t going to be a long visit, but I wanted to see the main sights. It was incredible with an “other-worldly” feel to it.

Artists’ Palette Drive

Unfortunately, what I hoped to be a peaceful and reflective experience, turned into a scary one by the end of the trip. Thanks to an unidentified critter that stung me, I got to experience the body’s fight/flight response in full blown action! By the end of it, I was fine, but in the moment it was quite frightening; it truly felt like I was living through a “death valley” moment in Death Valley.

Badwater Basin, lowest point in North America, 282 feet below sea level

I survived my literal Death Valley adventure, but I didn’t know more “valley of the shadow of death” experiences would be coming in 2020. No one knew the Covid pandemic was coming and that we would collectively be living through a valley season.

Over this past year, I’ve been reflecting on three important things to remember during hard times:

  1. Don’t go through Death Valley Alone

In hindsight, I should not have gone to Death Valley National Park alone; I let my independent spirit get the best of me. The same goes for any valley experience – we can’t do it alone. Even the fact that I couldn’t get cell service when I needed it in Death Valley, painfully highlighted how it can be downright dangerous when we can’t be connected!

Whether it’s an immediate traumatic experience, or long-lasting suffering – we need one another. The beauty of God’s design for humans reflects this need. He created us to exist in families; we are literally dependent when we come into the world. And he created the church, as one body with many members. “If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together.” (1 Cor. 12:26, ESV)

We were made as humans to need one another.

2. Be Prepared for Death Valley

I may have made the miscalculation of going alone, but at least I was prepared. I researched to know what I was getting into; I hydrated and had lots of water, I wore lots of suntan lotion and a hat, I had energy bars and gatorade, a first aid kit, a paper map, a flashlight, and I always made sure I had a least a half tank of gas. Those were wise things to do to be prepared.

Similarly, when going through a real-life valley experience, we need to be equipped. Prayer, Worship, Scripture, the Church – these are our lifeblood in times of suffering. And they prepare us for whatever suffering may come. By studying the Word we become immersed in God’s truth so that it becomes an anchor when we are wandering a wilderness.

Prayer, Worship, Scripture, the Church – these are our lifeblood in times of suffering.

3. Trust that God is with you in Death Valley

No matter what we are going through, or will go through, God has promised that he will never leave us or forsake us. As Moses preached to Joshua and the Israelites after they’ve been wandering for so long and are prepared to enter the Promised Land: “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or terrified because of them, for the Lord your God goes with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you.” (Deuteronomy 31:6, ESV)

No matter what we are going through, or will go through, God has promised that he will never leave us or forsake us.

During my frightening experience, with no humans around and no cell service, all I could do was remain grounded in knowing the presence of God was with me. Looking back, I am amazed at how he gave me the peace I needed (and how he designed the human body to respond in a crisis!).

A hot, sweaty, tired smile right before I got stung!

Life can throw us some very challenging experiences. How marvelous that the Creator of the Universe is with us every step of the way, longing to help and comfort us. We may have those times where we feel completely on our own and helpless, but we can trust that we are never truly alone.

Dante’s Peak, overlooking Badwater Basin in Death Valley

If life feels like a desert, be encouraged. Find family, friends, and the fellowship of believers to connect and carry you. Equip yourself with prayer and Scripture. Meditate and take comfort in the truth that God goes before you and behind you – he is with you as you walk through the valley of the shadow of death.

“And the Lord will guide you continually and satisfy your desire in scorched places and make your bones strong; and you shall be like a watered garden, like a spring of water, whose waters do not fail.”
Isaiah 58:11 ESV

All photos taken and owned by me, Bethany Peck.


Writing from the Heart

I had the opportunity to write an article for Fathom Magazine on nature, God, healing, and one of my favorite theological topics, dominion.

You can click on the image below to read it!

I believe and have experienced how God can speak to us through nature; it’s up to us to slow down, listen, pay attention, and steward his gifts—his creation and the soul he’s entrusted each of us with, equally.

And it was a joy to write about one of my favorite places. Many of my blog posts over the past two years have been inspired by this beautiful spot!

I hope you will enjoy the piece, and I hope it inspires you to spend more time outdoors with God!

>>> Read “Dominion through Delight” in Fathom Magazine.

For One Cup of Coffee a Day…

You can change the life of one child.  Her name is Mariam.

Precious Mariam is nearly 5.  She lives with her large family in Burkina Faso, one of the poorest countries in the world, and one with high risk for child rights violations.

Would you consider sponsoring Marian through Compassion International?  Your small monthly gift will allow the staff of EAC Centrale Nouna Child Development Center to provide Mariam with Bible teaching, health education, medical checkups, nutritious food, games, group activities, and choir.  I’m participating in the “Speak Up for One Child” campaign with Compassion, where I’ve been uniquely assigned with the task of finding a sponsor for Mariam, and I need your help!

It’s a mere $38 a month to sponsor Mariam, and to make a lasting impact in her life.  If you have questions, check out Compassion Speak Up or send me an email at bethany1027@gmail.com!

I understand if you think this sounds nice, but wonder about the effectiveness of the various international charitable and sponsorship organizations.  You might be thinking, do they really work?

Last year, Christianity Today reported on a University of San Francisco study that demonstrated the effectiveness of Compassion International’s child sponsorship programs.  It’s a fascinating article, and I recommend you read it here: “Want to Change the World? Sponsor a Child.”  What is interesting is that, Compassion was the only organization that was even willing to take part in this study – the first of it’s kind – and submit their programs to scrutiny.

After first examining the data, Bruce Wydick, a professor of economics and international studies, and the project’s director, wrote:

“We tried slicing the data different ways, but each showed significant educational improvements. You could beat this data senseless, and it was incapable of showing anything other than extremely large and statistically significant impacts on educational outcomes for sponsored children.”

But it’s not just the nutritional and educational programs that make the difference.  Wydick’s first conversation with Compassion’s recently retired CEO, Wess Stafford, after publishing the data, gets to the heart of what makes child sponsorship special.

“Your program works,” I said.

“I know,” he smiled.

“But I am analyzing this data as a dispassionate scientist, not as an advocate of Compassion like yourself,” I replied. “We’re not just finding positive correlations, but substantial causal effects from the program—in every country—especially Africa. I’m wondering what is happening here. You’re a former academic. I think there is something deeper going on in the program that would interest the greater development community. I need some leads.”

“Try hope,” he said.

Hope makes life worth living – no matter what you’re circumstances.  I’ve had the joy and honor of sponsoring Carlos from San Salvador, El Salvador and Purity from Meru, Kenya for 7, and 4 years, respectively. They are precious!  In his recently letter to me, Carlos shared with me his hopes, and what he’s been learning thanks to the program he is part of through Compassion:

“I want to tell you about my hope for the future.  In the future, I want to be a graphic designer specialist; I also want to play the guitar…I want to tell you that at the project, I learned a lot about the 10 commandments and how important they are for my life and to receive salvation.  I am very thankful with all your help and support and I thank you for the letter you sent me; I treasure it very much.”

Will you give hope to a little child such as Mariam?  Let me know!